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Author Topic: Part Mileage Life Questions  (Read 569 times)

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Offline NY Andrew

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Part Mileage Life Questions
« on: May 11, 2021, 02:45:18 pm »
Curious if anyone knows how many miles the following items can roughly expect as I know it varies on many conditions, but would like a rough estimate, thanks:

- Pirelli Night Dragon GT Rear Tire

SS Customs:
- Hard Riser Handlebar Bushings
- All Balls Steering Bearing
« Last Edit: May 11, 2021, 02:50:25 pm by NY Andrew »


2018 Yamaha Bolt-R

Online DrM

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Re: Part Mileage Life Questions
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2021, 04:54:10 pm »
Hard parts like bushings and bearings should last a lifetime with easy riding over smooth roads -- or, only a few years riding hard over rough roads.

Even worse for tires -- properly kept air pressure, easy riding over smooth roads, and easy mild braking might get you 20,000+ miles -- or worn out on a single day with burn outs, tire spins, hard accelerations, and hard braking (as in racing)   

Offline NY Andrew

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Part Mileage Life Questions
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2021, 09:33:51 am »
Gotcha.
Yea asked SSCustoms and he said, ďOur riser bushings will last the lifespan of the bike, the lifespan of the bearing bearings all depend on them being properly installed and properly maintained.Ē

And the manual states to repack with grease every 12k miles and it also says to check for looseness but wondering if you guys really do either of those? I donít have a garage or jack to lift it up and Iím assuming turn the handlebars side-to-side to check looseness? Unless itís referring to torque on the head nut. Iíd say based on really just weekend riding Iíll prob go 2-4 years before having to do either. Itís just a pain cuz I got this dash cam that mounts in front of that nut so had to remove it and adhesive in order for them to be able to easily reach that nut and not damage camera thatís my only gripe hah.

Thanks for the guesstimate for tires wasnít expecting that long but thatís good to know. Obviously Iíll keep an eye on tread, was just wondering. Do you happen to know mileage for the Pirelli Night Dragon front tire? Or same guesstimate as rear?

So seems Iím good for long time with both. They didnít have my front tire in stock so only got the rear replaced for now along with the bushings and bearings and definitely notice a smoother ride, mirrors arenít bouncing as crazy, not as much vibrations in handlebars, and I can safely ride with one hand or none at the dangerous death wobble speeds and itís not going berserk. So if anyoneís on the fenceójust get it all done.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2021, 09:35:24 am by NY Andrew »
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Online DrM

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Re: Part Mileage Life Questions
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2021, 12:07:39 pm »
Regards the All Balls steering head bearings -- they are tapered conical bearings rather than the spherical bearings the OEM part has.  The All Balls tapered bearings have much more contact area, and they should last much longer than, and not need to be re-greased as often as, the OEM ball bearings.  Tapered bearings can stand more torque on the tightening nuts than OEM ball bearings can, so your less likely to damage them.  The crown nut (Item 7 in the attached figure) on your steering head isn't what tightens those bearings, but rather it is the two multi-faceted nuts (Item 4 in the attached drawings).

Regarding tire wear: The driving (rear) tire likely gets more wear slipping and skidding on the pavement, but also likely has more tread, than the front tire.  Most riders don't use the rear brakes that much, and the front brakes are much more efficient.  So the front tire likely gets more braking wear, as the front wheel (usually) does more braking than the rear wheel.  The end result depends on your driving habits -- If you are an easy braker, then your front tire may last longer than the rear tire.  Rarely does the front tire wear out first, but it could happen if you are a hard braker, or your front-end is in bad shape.

Offline NY Andrew

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Part Mileage Life Questions
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2021, 08:06:48 pm »
Is there any easy way of telling when the bearings need to be greased? Again it varies, but so if OEM was every 12k re-grease you think maybe All Balls will be like 16-20k miles?

WOW!! Iím so happy you told me that about the nuts, I had no idea THOSE were the ones that get torqued, let alone all those pieces inside, honestly just thought that big crown nut was the one and almost was about to see what to torque it to today just to be sure itís up to spec.

The GT version of the tire is much more reinforced they say it lasts 20% longer than the regular version.
Iíve actually noticed myself using rear break more when approaching stop light and downshift when you just need that ever so slight braking to maintain motion to not have to put feet down trying to time the light turning green.

Great info, youíre the man as usual DrM!
2018 Yamaha Bolt-R

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Re: Part Mileage Life Questions
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2021, 10:05:27 pm »
Is there any easy way of telling when the bearings need to be greased? Again it varies, but so if OEM was every 12k re-grease you think maybe All Balls will be like 16-20k miles?
<snip>
No easy way I know of - you pretty much have to remove the steering stem to examine the steering bearings.  But you can check for any free-play or looseness in the steering stem, rust running out the steering tube, or any snags felt while tuning the wheel side to side.  other that that, I suspect it is a maintenance item largely left undone.

By the way, there are two sets of steering bearings (the set with the larger diameter hole goes on the bottom of the steering stem, while the set with the smaller diameter hole goes on the top of the steering stem,  The other bearing is shown in the Front Fork assembly diagram as item 41 & 42, which I include here for your edification.